Category Archives: Publications

New Industry Advisory RE: The Rosewood Trade

The Department of Environment and Energy has released further information regarding the trade of rosewood across borders. A significant addition to the last Industry Advisory has been made.

Trade with India, Indonesia and Lao

India and Indonesia have taken out reservations to the listing of Dalbergia species on CITES. This means that those countries are treated as not being Parties to CITES for the purposes of trade in those species.  This does not necessarily mean that India and Indonesia cannot trade in rosewood, but in order to trade with signatories to CITES (including Australia) they must provide documentation that is comparable to that required by CITES.

The Australian Department of Environment and Energy is currently assessing whether India and Indonesia will be able to provide alternative documentation that will meet Australia’s requirements and allow trade to resume. Until such documentation is agreed, no trade in Dalbergia specimens can occur between Australia and India or Indonesia.  If you are seeking to import or export rosewood from India or Indonesia, please contact the Department for further information on (02) 6274 1900.  

Indonesia has indicated that it will withdraw its reservation on 4th July 2017. 

A full list of Reservations is available on the CITES website:

The full Industry Advisory Follows.

Industry Advisory on New Rosewood Trade Regulations

A number of species of timber commonly referred to as rosewoods have recently been included on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).  The Appendix II listing took effect on 2 January 2017. Imports and exports of items containing rosewood now require CITES documentation. The listing is intended to regulate international trade to ensure that ongoing trade can continue, but only in a sustainable manner. Countries harvesting and exporting rosewood are required to demonstrate that international trade is sustainable.

The Australian Government Department of the Environment and Energy implements CITES requirements under national environment law (the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999). 

Overview of the species listing

The listing, which includes Indian rosewoods (Dalbergia latifolia and Dalbergia sissoo), applies to both raw timber and finished products, with the exception of:

a) Leaves, flowers, pollen, fruits, and seeds, 

b) Non-commercial exports of a maximum total weight of 10 kg per shipment, 

c) Parts and derivatives of Dalbergia cochinchinensis, which are covered by Annotation # 41, and 

d) Parts and derivatives of Dalbergia spp. originating and exported from Mexico, which are covered by Annotation # 6.2

Trade with India, Indonesia and Lao

India and Indonesia have taken out reservations to the listing of Dalbergia species on CITES. This means that those countries are treated as not being Parties to CITES for the purposes of trade in those species. 

This does not necessarily mean that India and Indonesia cannot trade in rosewood, but in order to trade with signatories to CITES (including Australia) they must provide documentation that is comparable to that required by CITES.

The Australian Department of Environment and Energy is currently assessing whether India and Indonesia will be able to provide alternative documentation that will meet Australia’s requirements and allow trade to resume.     

Until such documentation is agreed, no trade in Dalbergia specimens can occur between Australia and India or Indonesia.  If you are seeking to import or export rosewood from India or Indonesia, please contact the Department for further information on (02) 6274 1900.  

Indonesia has indicated that it will withdraw its reservation on 4th July 2017. 

A full list of Reservations is available on the CITES website:

Note that a suspension of commercial trade in specimens of the species Dalbergia cochinchinensis (except finished products, including carvings and furniture) from the Lao People’s Democratic Republic has been implemented. This species has been listed since 2013 and the trade suspension has been in place since September 2016. Full details are at: https://cites.org/sites/default/files/notif/E-Notif-2017012.pdf.                                          

 1 Annotation 4: All parts and derivatives, except: a) seeds (including seedpods of Orchidaceae), spores and pollen (including pollinia). The exemption does not apply to seeds from Cactaceae spp. exported from Mexico, and to seeds from Beccariophoenix madagascariensis and Dypsis decaryi exported from Madagascar; b) seedling or tissue cultures obtained in vitro, in solid or liquid media, transported in sterile containers; c)cut flowers of artificially propagated plants; d) fruits, and parts and derivatives thereof, of naturalized or artificially propagated plants of the genus Vanilla (Orchidaceae) and of the family Cactaceae; e)stems, flowers, and parts and derivatives thereof, of naturalized or artificially propagated plants of the genera Opuntia subgenus Opuntia and Selenicereus (Cactaceae); and f) finished products of Euphorbia antisyphilitica packaged and ready for retail trade. 2 Annotation 6: Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets and plywood.

Permitting requirements

Re-exporting rosewood harvested before 2 January 2017

If you are re-exporting from existing stocks of rosewood that was harvested before the listing date (2 January 2017), you must obtain a CITES pre-Convention certificate from the Australian CITES Management Authority (the Department of the Environment and Energy). 

Pre-Convention certificates certify that the item was obtained before the CITES listing took effect. They are issued free of charge, and are valid for a period of 6 months. 

You are encouraged to contact the CITES Management Authority of the importing country to find out if there are any import requirements for pre-Convention items. Contact details for overseas CITES Management Authorities are available here: https://cites.org/eng/cms/index.php/component/cp .

To obtain an Australian CITES pre-Convention certificate you will need to demonstrate the specimen is not an Australian native species, and that the specimen was obtained legally before 2 January 2017, (the date of listing on CITES). 

Examples of how to demonstrate the origin and legal source of the specimen:

        Receipt of purchase stating the date of purchase and the country of origin 

       A record of the shipment or transit of the item into Australia 

       A Statutory Declaration and supporting information detailing how the item was acquired

Examples of how to demonstrate a specimen is a pre-Convention specimen:

        An independent age assessment of the item demonstrating it was obtained prior to 2 January 2017.

       A Statutory Declaration with relevant supporting information demonstrating the specimen was obtained prior to 2 January 2017.

You will also need to provide a unique identifier that allows the specimen to be directly tracked to the certificate provided, for instance a serial number. 

Re-exporting rosewood harvested after 2 January 2017

If you are re-exporting rosewood that was harvested after the listing date (2 January 2017), you must obtain an Australian CITES re-export permit from the Australian CITES Management Authority (the Department of the Environment and Energy). These are valid for a period of 6 months, and are issued at a charge of $65 for a single use permit, or $163 for a multiple use permit – a single use allows one shipment per permit, whereas a multiple use allows multiple shipments under the one permit, provided they occur within the 6 month validity period and do not exceed the total number of specimens outlined on the multiple use permit. You are encouraged to contact the CITES Management Authority of the importing country to find out what import requirements they may have.   

To obtain an Australian CITES re-export permit, you need to demonstrate the specimen was legally (re) exported from the last country of export and imported into Australia. Documentation required includes:

        The CITES (re) export permit the country of last (re) export 

       The Australian CITES import permit

Please note that acquittal paperwork for the import of the specimen must be completed and returned to the Department before a re-export permit can be granted. 

Importing rosewood

If you are importing from existing stocks of rosewood harvested before the listing date (2 January 2017), you will require a CITES pre-Convention certificate from the exporting country (noting that reservations have been taken out by India and Indonesia). This certificate will need to travel with the shipment. You do not need any documentation from Australia to import pre-Convention items. You are encouraged to provide a copy of the overseas pre-Convention certificate to the Department via email to confirm the pre-Convention certificate meets Australia’s requirements (as each CITES Party issues pre-Convention certificates differently). 

If you are importing rosewood harvested after the listing date (2 January 2017), you will require a CITES (re) export permit from the exporting country and an Australian CITES import permit. These are valid for 6 months and can be issued for a single use import or for multiple shipments. Both permits must be issued prior to the shipment occurring, and be valid until the shipment has taken place. 

Contact the Wildlife Trade Permits team on (02) 6274 1900 (option 3) or at wildlifetrade@environment.gov.au for more information on CITES permits.

FAQ

Which species of rosewood are listed under CITES? 

• All species of the Dalbergia genus are listed under Appendix II to CITES except Dalbergia nigra (Brazilian rosewood) which is listed on Appendix I to CITES

• Pterocarpus erinaceus 

• Guibourtia demeusei, Guibourtia pellegriniana, Guibourtia tessmannii (collectively referred to as African rosewood, Akume or Bubinga)

What does this mean?

International imports and exports of items or products containing any of these listed rosewood species must be accompanied by relevant CITES documentation (or comparable documentation from India and Indonesia). 

Species listed on Appendix II of CITES may be traded internationally, provided the trade has been determined not to be detrimental to the survival of the species in the wild. Once deemed sustainable, trade is generally regulated through permits that authorise the import or export of the item containing the CITES listed species. 

Imports and exports of most items containing rosewood will require CITES documentation, including items/products obtained before 2 January 2017 (the date of listing).

CITES documentation is generally not required for non-commercial imports and exports of personal items of up to 10 kg per shipment containing either Dalbergia or any of the three listed Guibourtia species.

How do I apply for a CITES permit or pre-Convention Certificate

Apply online at: https://forms.business.gov.au/smartforms/servlet/SmartForm.pdf?formCode=WTPH

How much does a CITES permit cost? 

A single use CITES permit (for one single export or import) costs $65. 

A CITES multiple consignment authority (which allows multiple shipments within a six month period) costs $163. 

A pre-Convention CITES certificate, which is required to certify that the item was obtained before the listing came into effect, is free. 

How long does it take to issue a CITES permit?

Under Australian law, a CITES permit application must be assessed within 40 business days of all relevant information being received from the applicant. However we seek to process all applications as quickly as possible. We are working closely with all traders who have been impacted by the recent listing of new species under CITES to minimize business disruption. 

Why has the listing occurred?

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is an international agreement that aims to ensure that international trade in wild plants and animals does not threaten species’ survival in the wild. Rosewood has been listed on Appendix II to CITES because of the threat of uncontrolled trade on the survival of these species.

How can I find out more?

More information on how to obtain a CITES permit is available from the Department of the Environment and Energy at http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/wildlife-trade or:

The Director | Wildlife Trade Regulation  | Department of the Environment and Energy

GPO Box 787  Canberra ACT 2601

Telephone: (02) 6274 1900

Facsimile: (02) 6274 1921

Email: wildlifetrade@environment.gov.au

Australian Musician Online

Australian Musician Serving the End User and the Industry in Providing the latest products news from members and plenty of interesting articles and interviews with the people who play our products – the musicians of Australia.

The online magazine is exclusively for the use of AMA members. Get involved and put your products in front of the Australian musician community. We have designed the content so that we can reach Australia’s enthusiastic music makers through interesting and informative material. Content will be industry and products news, interviews with local and international musicians, new products and new local talent, technique tips and tricks, informative videos, how to lessons and product reviews.

We’re leveraging our success as Australia’s longest running print publication for musicians (published by the AMA since 1995) to present this new platform – a platform to reach your customers and pull them towards you through the focused methods of online technology and social media.

Our new format will become a daily source of inspiration for users as we make it easy for them to engage with the information and be entertained by the content.

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AMA Market Report

ama-market-report-2012-iconThe AMA Market Report is a comprehensive review of the last 10 years of the Australian imports market, spanning 48 pages of detailed analysis.

One copy of this report is made available at no charge to all paid-up members of the Association.

Additional printed copies are available to members for $44 per copy. Melmbers can download the report in the Members Only area of this website

For more information or to place orders, please contact the AMA office:

p: 03 9254 1019
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